Send a fighter to Washington not a bench-warmer!

September 13 will be “Veto Day” when legislators have one final chance to override vetoes from the governor on bills previously passed by the legislature. These votes will close a critical chapter in my public service only two days after a new chapter hopefully begins with my selection on September 11 as your Democratic nominee for Congress.

I am proud of my voting record in Concord. In 2018, I was called on to vote 246 times. One of my key votes included opposing “Right to Work” legislation. I also opposed attempts to chip away at reproductive freedom for women, to legalize school vouchers, and to suppress the right of college students to vote in our elections. On the other side of the ledger, I supported successful bills that banned harmful “gay conversion” therapy, protected our trans citizens from discrimination, and secured continued health care for 55,000 Granite Staters through the renewal of expanded Medicaid.

My legislative record for 2018 also included being the primary sponsor or the co-sponsor for 41 separate bills. Despite being a member of the minority party, 4 bills I sponsored or co-sponsored were signed into law during the 2017 legislative session and 12 of them were signed into law in the 2018 legislative session by the governor. I'm already doing the work of a Congressperson by writing important policy and working across the aisle to get it passed, in a legislative body that mirrors Congress.

Bills signed into law in 2017 Session:

Chaptered Law: 0091  HB220  Title: amending the title of the chapter relating to child pornography.

Chaptered Law: 0138  HB431  Title: establishing a commission to study long-term goals and requirements for drinking water in the seacoast area.

Chaptered Law: 0197  HB484  Title: establishing a commission on the seacoast cancer cluster investigation.

Chaptered Law: 0166  HB511  Title: (New Title) establishing a commission to study environmentally-triggered chronic illness.

Bills signed into law in 2018 Session:

Chaptered Law: 0028  HB1281        Title: establishing an executive order registry.

Chaptered Law: 0296  HB1356        Title: (Second New Title) relative to data sharing between the department of environmental services and the department of health and human services; making an appropriation to the department of business and economic affairs for relocation costs; and relative to the exemption for recreational vehicles from property taxation.

Chaptered Law: 0351  HB1446        Title: relative to childhood cancer awareness month.

Chaptered Law: 0353  HB1565 -FN Title: (Second New Title) requiring the secure psychiatric unit to be accredited as a behavioral health facility.

Chaptered Law: 0188  HB1577        Title: relative to the administration of anesthesia by dentists.

Chaptered Law: 0190  HB1592 -FN  Title: (Second New Title) requiring the commissioner of the department of environmental services to review ambient groundwater standards for arsenic.

Chaptered Law: 0306  HB1766 -FN  Title: (New Title) requiring the department of environmental services to report to the general court regarding bedrock testing and perfluorochemical contamination in the Seacoast area and at other landfills and hazardous waste sites.

Chaptered Law: 0308  HB1807 -FN  Title: relative to exploitation of elderly, disabled, or impaired adults and establishing a protective order for vulnerable adults.

Chaptered Law: 0004  SB-247-FN    Title: (New Title) preventing childhood lead poisoning from paint and water.

Chaptered Law: 0368  SB309 -FN    Title: (Second New Title) regulating groundwater pollution caused by polluting emissions in the air and relative to standards for perfluorochemicals in drinking water, ambient groundwater, and surface water.

Chaptered Law: 0055  SB574 -FN    Title: clarifying the repayment period for parental reimbursement.

Chaptered Law: 0176  HB1319         Title: prohibiting discrimination based on gender identity.

These bills included a broad range of environmental legislation intended to toughen state contamination standards, speed clean-up of contaminated water supplies, and protect our citizens from polluters. Other successes included a bill requiring treatment of mentally ill people deemed dangerous enough to be confined in our state prison as well as a bill to make it easier for elder abuse victims to obtain orders of protection from abusive caregivers or family members.

While there were highlights, there were also setbacks. Lobbyists were also successful in killing bills to outlaw toxic crumb rubber playing fields and to disclose test results for perfluorinated chemicals and other contaminants to labels of bottled water sold in New Hampshire.

I believe that a strong legislative record in Concord is a good indicator of what you can expect from me in Congress. I won’t just vote in your interest. I will file legislation and fight for changes in our laws that make a real difference for New Hampshire workers and families.

Kimberly Sychterz